Time to kick the butt of the most common litter item in the world: Ban cigarette filters

Green, Dannielle S ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9122-8160, Almroth, Bethanie Carney, Altman, Rebecca, Bergmann, Melanie, Gündoğdu, Sedat, Warrier, Anish Kumar, Boots, Bas ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6421-0961, Walker, Tony R, Krieger, Anja and Syberg, Kristian (2023) Time to kick the butt of the most common litter item in the world: Ban cigarette filters. Science of the Total Environment, 865. ISSN 1879-1026

[img] Text
Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under the following license: Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (31kB)
[img]
Preview
Text
Published Version
Available under the following license: Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (366kB) | Preview
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.161256

Abstract

Cigarette filters offer no public health benefits, are single-use plastics (cellulose acetate) and are routinely littered. Filters account for a significant proportion of plastic litter worldwide, requiring considerable public funds to remove, and are a source of microplastics. Used cigarette filters can leech toxic chemicals and pose an ecological risk to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Bottom-up measures, such as focusing on consumer behaviour, are ineffective and we need to impose top-down solutions (i.e., bans) if we are to reduce the prevalence of this number one litter item. Banning filters offers numerous ecological, socioeconomic, and public health benefits.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Cigarette filters, Cellulose acetate, Single-use plastics, Ecological risk, Planetary boundaries, Plastics treaty
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2023 15:18
Last Modified: 13 Jan 2023 15:18
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/708181

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item