Association between cooking fuels and mild cognitive impairment among older adults from six low- and middle-income countries

Smith, Lee ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5340-9833, Pizzol, Damiano, Lopez-Sanchez, Guillermo, Kostev, Karel, Oh, Hans, Jacob, Louis, Veronese, Nicola, Underwood, Benjamin, Butler, Laurie T., Barnett, Yvonne A. ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0271-2266, Tully, Mark and Koyanagi, Ai (2022) Association between cooking fuels and mild cognitive impairment among older adults from six low- and middle-income countries. Scientific Reports, 12. p. 14055. ISSN 2045-2322

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Official URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-17216-w

Abstract

There is a small body of evidence suggesting that unclean cooking fuel use may be associated with cognitive decline. However, to date, no study has investigated the association between unclean cooking fuel and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Thus, we investigated the association between cooking fuel type or ventilation type and MCI among adults aged ≥ 65 years using nationally representative datasets from six low‑ and middle‑income countries. Cross‑sectional, community‑based data from the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global Ageing and adult health (SAGE) were analyzed. MCI was defined using the National Institute on Aging‑Alzheimer’s Association criteria. Unclean cooking fuel referred to kerosene/paraffin, coal/charcoal, wood, agriculture/crop, animal dung, and shrubs/grass. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess associations. Data on 13,623 individuals were analyzed [mean (SD) age 72.8 (11.0) years; 45.5% males]. Unclean cooking fuel (vs. clean cooking fuel) was associated with a significant 1.48 (95% CI = 1.08–2.03) times higher odds for MCI. Having no chimney or hood for cooking ventilation was also associated with significantly higher odds for MCI (OR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.25–2.84). Unclean cooking fuel use and lack of chimney or hood for cooking ventilation were associated with higher odds for MCI. Findings support the implementation of the United Nations Sustainable Goal 7, which advocates affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all, as this may also help reduce MCI and ultimately dementia

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Cooking Fuel, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Older Adults
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 26 Jul 2022 16:53
Last Modified: 31 Aug 2022 22:16
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/707773

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