Changes and correlates of screentime in adults and children during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Trott, Mike and Driscoll, Robin and Iraldo, Enrico and Pardhan, Shahina (2022) Changes and correlates of screentime in adults and children during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis. EClinicalMedicine, 48. p. 101452. ISSN 2589-5370

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eclinm.2022.101452

Abstract

Background- Screen time has increased as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and several correlates have been associated with these increases. These changes, however, have not been aggregated. It was the aim of this review to (a) aggregate changes in screen time in adults and children, and (b) report on variables in relation to screen time during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods- A systematic review of major databases was undertaken for studies published from inception to 06/12/2021, using a pre-published protocol (PROSPERO ID: CRD42021261422). Studies reporting (a) screen time pre-versus-during the pandemic, (b) screen time percentage change, or (c) correlates of screen time during the pandemic were included. A random effects meta-analysis was undertaken with subgroup analysis by age group and type of screen time. Findings- After review, 89 studies (n = 204,734; median age=20·6; median female=53·3%) were included. The majority of studies were cross-sectional. With regards to total screen time, primary aged children (6–10 years) reported largest increases (1·4 hrs/day; 95%CI 1·1–1·7), followed by adults (>18 years; 1·0 hrs/day; 95%CI 0·7–1·2), adolescents (11–17 years; 0·9 hrs/day; 95%CI 0·3–1·5), and young children (0–5 years; 0·6 hrs/day 95%CI 0·3–0·9 hrs/day). For leisure screen time (non-work/non-academic), primary aged children reported largest increases (1·0 hrs/day 95%CI 0·8–1·3), followed by adults (0·7hr/day 95%CI 0·3–1·2), young children (0·6 hrs/day; 95%CI 0·4–0·8), with adolescents reporting the lowest increase (0·5 hrs/day 95%CI 0·3–0·7). Several correlates were associated with reported increases in screen time, including adverse dietary behaviours, sleep, mental health, parental health, and eye health. Interpretation- Pooled evidence suggest that primary aged children reported the highest increase in both total and leisure screen time during COVID-19. It is recommended that screen time should be reduced in favour of non-sedentary activities. This study has the potential to inform public health policy and future guidance regarding screen time, and to inform future research in this area. Funding- No funding was received for this study.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Screentime, Covid-19, Children, Adults, Review
Faculty: COVID-19 Research Collection
Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2022 12:14
Last Modified: 31 May 2022 16:17
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/707537

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