Fishing Participation, Motivators and Barriers among UK Anglers with Disabilities: Opportunities and Implications for Green Social Prescribing

Lindsay, Rosie and Carmichael, Christina and Allen, Peter M. and Fossey, Matt and Godier-McBard, Lauren R. and Butler, Laurie T. and Trott, Mike and Pardhan, Shahina and Tully, Mark A. and Wilson, Jason and Torrance, Andy and Smith, Lee (2022) Fishing Participation, Motivators and Barriers among UK Anglers with Disabilities: Opportunities and Implications for Green Social Prescribing. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19 (8). p. 4730. ISSN 1660-4601

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084730

Abstract

Green social prescribing, which includes the referral of patients to nature-based activities, could exacerbate inequalities between people with disabilities and people without. Research suggests fishing could be more inclusive relative to other outdoor sports. To understand if fishing is an inclusive sport, and the potential benefits and barriers to prescribing fishing, the present study compared participation, motivators and barriers to fishing, between anglers with and without disabilities. UK adults were invited to participate in an online survey. Chi-square tests examined differences between anglers with and without disabilities regarding the type of fishing anglers engaged in, the frequency of fishing, the length of time spent fishing, motivators for fishing and barriers to fishing. Among 1799 anglers (97.5% male), 292 (16.2%) anglers reported having a disability. Most anglers with disabilities were over 55 years old (56.5%). There was no difference in fishing participation, or motivators for fishing, between anglers with and without disabilities; however, anglers with disabilities were more likely to report ‘costs’, ‘lack of transport’ and ‘having no one to go with them’ as barriers. Overall, there appeared to be no differences in fishing participation between anglers with versus without disabilities, although additional barriers to participation may exist.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Fishing, Disability, Social prescribing, Angling, Blue prescribing, Wellbeing, Health
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine & Social Care
Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 12 Apr 2022 16:21
Last Modified: 31 May 2022 16:18
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/707469

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