Sexual minority status, religiosity, and suicidal behaviors among college students in the United States

Oh, Hans, Goehring, Jessica, Smith, Lee, Zhou, Sasha and Blosnich, John (2022) Sexual minority status, religiosity, and suicidal behaviors among college students in the United States. Journal of Affective Disorders, 305. pp. 65-70. ISSN 1573-2517

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2022.02.068

Abstract

Background- Religiosity has been protective against suicidal behaviors, though it is unclear whether the protective effects extend to the high-risk group of sexual minorities. Methods- We analyzed data from the Healthy Minds Study, which was administered to college students enrolled in one of 140 campuses across the United States (N = 104,463) from September through December 2020, and from January to June 2021. We limited the sample to emerging adulthood (i.e., ages 18–30). We calculated the prevalence of suicidal behaviors and the mean of importance of religion, stratifying by sexual minority status. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine the associations between predictors (sexual minority status, importance of religion) and outcomes (suicidal ideation, suicide plan, and suicide attempt), adjusting for age, gender, and race/ethnicity. We then tested to see whether the association between importance of religion and suicidal behaviors was conditional on sexual minority status. Results- Significantly larger proportions of sexual minority students reported suicidal behaviors than heterosexual students. A larger proportion of heterosexual students viewed religion to be very important in their lives when compared with sexual minority students. Being a sexual minority was associated with greater odds of all suicidal behaviors, and greater importance of religion was associated with lower odds. The importance of religion was significantly associated with lower odds of suicidal behaviors for heterosexual students when compared with sexual minority students. Conclusion- The association between importance of religion and suicidal behaviors was conditional on sexual minority status.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Sexual minority, Religiosity, Suicidal behaviour, College students, United States, Sexuality, Religion, Young adults
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2022 12:11
Last Modified: 16 Mar 2022 16:25
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/707354

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