Elevated levels of hoarding in ADHD: A special link with inattention

Morein-Zamir, Sharon, Kasese, Michael, Chamberlain, Samuel R. and Trachtenberg, Estherina (2022) Elevated levels of hoarding in ADHD: A special link with inattention. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 145. pp. 167-174. ISSN 1879-1379

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.12.024

Abstract

Hoarding Disorder (HD) is under recognised and under-treated. Though HD develops by early adulthood, patients present only later in life, resulting in research based largely on samples of predominantly older females. Whilst formerly associated with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), it is now recognised that individuals with HD often have inattention symptoms reminiscent of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Here, we investigated HD in adults with ADHD. Patients in an ADHD clinic (n = 88) reported on ADHD, HD and OCD-related symptoms, and compared with age, gender and education matched controls (n = 90). Findings were assessed independently in an online UK sample to verify replication using a dimensional approach (n = 220). Clinically significant hoarding symptoms were found in ∼20% versus 2% of ADHD and control groups, respectively, with those with hoarding being on average in their thirties and with approximately half being male. Greater hoarding severity was noted even in the remaining patients compared with controls (d = 0.89). Inattention was the only significant statistical predictor of hoarding severity in patients. Similarly, inattention, alongside depression and anxiety were the greatest predictors of hoarding in the independent sample where 3.2% identified as having clinically significant hoarding. Patients with ADHD had a high frequency of hoarding symptoms, which were specifically linked to inattention. HD should be routinely assessed in individuals with ADHD, as they do not typically disclose associated difficulties, despite these potentially leading to impaired everyday functioning. Research in HD should also investigate adults with ADHD, who are younger and with a greater prevalence of males than typical HD samples.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Hoarding disorder, Executive function Inattention, Obsessive compulsive disorder
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
Depositing User: Lisa Blanshard
Date Deposited: 25 Feb 2022 11:05
Last Modified: 16 Mar 2022 16:22
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/707347

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