Sleep duration and sarcopenia in adults aged ≥65 years from low- and middle-income countries

Smith, Lee and Shin, Jae Il and Veronese, Nicola and Soysal, Pinar and López-Sánchez, Guillermo F. and Pizzol, Damiano and Demurtas, Jacopo and Tully, Mark A. and Barnett, Yvonne A. and Butler, Laurie T. and Koyanagi, Ai (2022) Sleep duration and sarcopenia in adults aged ≥65 years from low- and middle-income countries. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research. ISSN 1720-8319

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40520-022-02074-3

Abstract

Background- Sleep duration may influence risk for sarcopenia but studies on this topic are scarce, especially from low and- middle-income countries (LMICs). Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between sleep duration and sarcopenia among adults aged ≥ 65 years from five LMICs (China, Ghana, India, Russia, South Africa). Methods- Cross-sectional, community-based data from the WHO study on global ageing and adult health (SAGE) were analysed. Sarcopenia was defined as having low skeletal muscle mass (SMM) and weak handgrip strength, while severe sarcopenia was defined as having low SMM, weak handgrip strength, and slow gait speed. Self-reported sleep duration in the past two nights were averaged and classified as ≤ 6, > 6 to ≤ 9, and ≥ 9 h/day. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results- Data on 13,210 adults aged ≥ 65 years [mean (SD) age 72.6 (11.3) years; 55.0% females] were analyzed. In the overall sample, compared to > 6 to ≤ 9 h/day of sleep duration, > 9 h/day was associated with 1.70 (95% CI 1.15–2.51) and 1.75 (95% CI 1.08–2.84) times higher odds for sarcopenia and severe sarcopenia, respectively. No significant associations were observed among males, but associations were particularly pronounced among females [i.e., OR = 2.19 (95% CI 1.26–3.81) for sarcopenia, and OR = 2.26 (95% CI 1.20–4.23) for severe sarcopenia]. Conclusions- Long sleep duration was associated with an increased odds of sarcopenia and severe sarcopenia in LMICs, particularly in females. Future studies should investigate whether addressing long sleep duration among females can lead to lower risk for sarcopenia onset in LMICs.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Sleep problems, Sarcopenia, Older adults, Low- and- middle income countries
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine & Social Care
Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2022 09:36
Last Modified: 16 Mar 2022 16:21
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/707236

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