Effect of Low Versus High-Heeled Footwear on Spinopelvic Alignment at Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle in Young Adult Women: A Biopsychosocial Perspective

El-Shafei, Manal A. and Yousef, Amel M. and Hamada, Hamada A. and Mohamed, Mohamed F. and Al-Shenqiti, Abdullah M. and Koura, Ghada M. R. and López-Sánchez, Guillermo F. (2021) Effect of Low Versus High-Heeled Footwear on Spinopelvic Alignment at Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle in Young Adult Women: A Biopsychosocial Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology, 12. p. 792446. ISSN 1664-1078

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.792446

Abstract

High-heeled shoes adversely affect spinal curvature, increase the risk of low back pain, and disturb the normal gait pattern. The purpose of this study was to examine, from a biopsychosocial point of view, the combined effect of wearing two different heel heights and of hormonal oscillation throughout different phases of the menstrual cycle on spinopelvic alignment. Notably, 70 females with an average age of 20.42 ± 1.51 years participated in this study, wearing each female two different heel heights as follows: low (2.5 cm) and high (7 cm). Spinopelvic alignment was evaluated by rasterstereography formetric 3D analysis during early follicular, ovulatory, and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Statistical analysis showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) on spinopelvic alignment [kyphotic angle (KA), trunk inclination (TI), and pelvic inclination] between wearing low- or high-heeled shoes during early follicular, ovulatory, and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Considering that high-heeled shoes are traditionally associated with femininity, body image, beauty, and charm, this research has important biopsychosocial implications that should be explored in detail in future studies.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: high heels, spinopelvic alignment, menstrual cycle, footwear, bio-psychosocial approach
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine & Social Care
Depositing User: Lisa Blanshard
Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2021 13:45
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2022 15:22
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/707197

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