Multimorbidity increases the risk for sarcopenia onset: Longitudinal analyses from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

Veronese, Nicola and Smith, Lee and Cereda, Emanuele and Maggi, Stefania and Barbagallo, Mario and Dominguez, Ligia and Koyanagi, Ai (2021) Multimorbidity increases the risk for sarcopenia onset: Longitudinal analyses from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Experimental Gerontology, 156. p. 111624. ISSN 1873-6815

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2021.111624

Abstract

Background- Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated that multimorbidity is associated with sarcopenia. However, to date, this association has not been extensively investigated longitudinally. Therefore, the aim of the present paper was to explore the association between multimorbidity at baseline and sarcopenia onset over 12 years of follow-up in a large representative sample of the English older adult population. Methods- Representative data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) were analyzed. Multimorbidity at baseline was defined as ≥2 medical conditions, of 17 conditions included. Participants were considered to have sarcopenia if they had low handgrip strength and skeletal muscle mass (i.e., lower skeletal mass index) at waves 4, 6, 8. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess prospective associations between multimorbidity at baseline and sarcopenia at follow-up. Results- 2873 older participants (mean age: 69.1 years, 54% females) who did not have sarcopenia at baseline were included. The prevalence of multimorbidity at baseline was 57.3%. Over twelve years of follow-up, 394 participants (=13.7% of the initial population) became sarcopenic. The presence of multimorbidity at baseline was associated with an increased risk of sarcopenia during follow-up (OR = 2.06; 95%CI: 1.61–2.62) in the univariable analysis, and even after adjusting for multiple potential confounders (OR = 1.23; 95%CI: 1.01–1.61). Conclusions- In this large representative sample of older adults from the UK, multimorbidity at baseline was associated with a higher risk of sarcopenia during twelve-year follow-up. It may be prudent to target those with multimorbidity to aid in the prevention of sarcopenia.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Multimorbidity, Sarcopenia, ELSA, Older adults, Epidemiology, Ageing, Comorbidity, Cohort, Prospective
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2021 15:00
Last Modified: 10 May 2022 09:17
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/707087

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