Economic strain, parental education, and psychotic experiences among college students in the United States: Findings from the Healthy Minds Study 2020

Oh, Hans and Nagendra, Arundati and Besecker, Megan and Smith, Lee and Koyanagi, Ai and Wang, Julia (2021) Economic strain, parental education, and psychotic experiences among college students in the United States: Findings from the Healthy Minds Study 2020. Early Intervention in Psychiatry. ISSN 1751-7893

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/eip.13221

Abstract

Aim- Socioeconomic status (SES) is linked to psychosis, and much can be learned by examining how various indicators of SES—specifically economic strain and intergenerational transfer of resources—are related to sub-threshold psychotic experiences among college students. Methods- Using data from the Healthy Minds Survey (September 2020–December 2020), we used multivariable logistic regression models to examine the associations between five SES indicators and 12-month psychotic experiences, adjusting for age, gender and race/ethnicity. We also examined the count of predictors and psychotic experiences. Results- Each indicator of economic strain was associated with greater odds of psychotic experiences. In particular, increasing levels of financial stress (current, childhood and pandemic-related) were associated with greater odds of psychotic experiences in a dose–response fashion. Food insecurity was associated with double the odds of psychotic experiences. In terms of intergenerational transfer of resources, having either one or no parents who attended college was associated with significantly greater odds of having psychotic experiences, when compared with having both parents who attended college. Examining all predictors in the same model, only childhood and current financial stress and food insecurity were significantly associated with psychotic experiences. The count of predictors was significantly associated with greater odds of having psychotic experiences in a dose-dependent fashion. Conclusions- Among college students, economic strain and intergenerational transfer of resources were associated with recent psychotic experiences, highlighting the importance of economic interventions targeting young adults to influence risk for psychosis.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: psychotic experiences, economic strain, food insecurity, parental education, psychotic experiences
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 17 Aug 2021 10:46
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2021 15:37
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/706836

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