The Environment of Birthplace and Self-Reported Mental Health Conditions: Findings from the American Panel of Life

Oh, Hans and Goehring, Jessica and Jacob, Louis and Smith, Lee (2021) The Environment of Birthplace and Self-Reported Mental Health Conditions: Findings from the American Panel of Life. Epidemiologia, 2 (3). pp. 256-261. ISSN 2673-3986

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.3390/epidemiologia2030019

Abstract

Studies from around the globe have found that urbanicity is associated with greater risk for certain psychiatric disorders, though the association has been less evident in the United States. We analyzed data collected in 2019 from the RAND American Life Panel (n = 2554), which were representative of the general adult population of the United States. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the associations between environment of birthplace (large urban, small urban, suburban, rural) and psychiatric disorders, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. We found that being born in a large urban area was associated with greater odds of having any psychiatric disorder when compared with being born in a rural area. However, when looking at specific disorders, we found that being born in a large urban area was only significantly associated greater odds of anxiety disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but was not associated with bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or alcohol/substance use disorder. Being born in a small urban area was marginally associated with anxiety disorder. Future studies should examine why urban birthplace has only been associated with anxiety disorders and PTSD in the United States, and why urbanicity is associated with mood disorders in other parts of the world but not in the United States.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: urban, rural, psychiatric disorders, city, suburb, metropolitan
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 09 Jul 2021 15:58
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2021 18:50
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/706715

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