Food insecurity (hunger) and fast-food consumption among 180,164 adolescents aged 12-15 years from 68 countries

Smith, Lee and Barnett, Yvonne A. and López-Sánchez, Guillermo F. and Shin, Jae Il and Jacob, Louis and Butler, Laurie T. and Cao, Chao and Yang, Lin and Schuch, Felipe B. and Tully, Mark A. and Koyanagi, Ai (2021) Food insecurity (hunger) and fast-food consumption among 180,164 adolescents aged 12-15 years from 68 countries. British Journal of Nutrition. ISSN 1475-2662

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114521001173

Abstract

Food insecurity has been shown to be associated with fast-food consumption. However, to date, studies on this specific topic are scarce. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between food insecurity and fast-food consumption in adolescents aged 12-15 years from 68 countries (7 low-income, 27 lower middle-income, 20 upper middle-income, 14 high-income countries). Cross-sectional, school-based data from the Global School-based Student Health Survey were analyzed. Data on past 30-day food insecurity (hunger) and fast-food consumption in the past 7 days were collected. Multivariable logistic regression and meta-analysis were conducted to assess associations. Models were adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index. There were 180,164 adolescents aged 12-15 years [mean (SD) age 13.8 (1.0) years; 50.8% boys] included in the analysis. Overall, severe food insecurity (i.e., hungry because there was not enough food in home most of the time or always) was associated with 1.17 (95%CI=1.08-1.26) times higher odds for fast-food consumption. The estimates pooled by country-income levels were significant in low-income countries (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.30; 95%CI=1.05-1.60), lower middle-income countries (aOR=1.15; 95%CI=1.02-1.29), and upper middle-income countries (aOR=1.26; 95%CI=1.07-1.49), but not in high-income countries (aOR=1.04; 95%CI=0.88-1.23). The mere co-occurrence of food insecurity and fast-food consumption is of public health importance. To tackle this issue, a strong governmental and societal approach is required to utilize effective methods as demonstrated in some high-income countries such as the implementation of food banks and the adoption of free school meals.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Food-insecurity, Fast Food, Adolescent, Multi-Country
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine & Social Care
Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2021 14:46
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2021 18:51
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/706449

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