Investigating the opposing effect of two different green tea supplements on oxidative stress, mitochondrial function and cell viability in HepG2 cells

Shil, Aparna and Davies, Christopher and Gautam, Lata and Roberts, Justin D. and Chichger, Havovi (2021) Investigating the opposing effect of two different green tea supplements on oxidative stress, mitochondrial function and cell viability in HepG2 cells. Journal of Dietary Supplements. ISSN 1939-022X

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/19390211.2021.1894304

Abstract

Green tea extract (GTE) improves exercise outcomes and reduces obesity. However, case studies indicate contradictory physiology regarding liver function and toxicity. We studied the effect of two different decaffeinated GTE (dGTE) products, from a non-commercial (dGTE1) and commercial (dGTE2) supplier, on hepatocyte function using the human cell model, HepG2. dGTE1 was protective against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced apoptosis and cell death by attenuating oxidative stress pathways. Conversely, dGTE2 increased cellular and mitochondrial oxidative stress and apoptosis. A bioavailability study with dGTE showed the major catechin in GTE, EGCG, reached 0.263 µg·ml−1. In vitro, at this concentration, EGCG mimicked the protective effect of dGTE1. GC/MS analysis identified steric acid and higher levels of palmitic acid in dGTE2 versus dGTE1 supplements. We demonstrate the significant biological differences between two GTE supplements which may have potential implications for manufacturers and consumers to be aware of the biological effects of supplementation.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: basic science research, cell biology, hepatic cells, green tea extract, oxidative stress
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2021 16:15
Last Modified: 13 Apr 2021 16:22
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/706383

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