Absolute microvascular resistance by continuous thermodilution predicts microvascular dysfunction after ST-elevation myocardial infarction

Konstantinou, Klio and Karamasis, Grigoris V. and Davies, John R. and Alsanjari, Osama and Tang, Kare H. and Gamma, Reto A. and Kelly, Paul R. and Pijls, Nico H. J. and Keeble, Thomas R. and Clesham, Gerald J. (2020) Absolute microvascular resistance by continuous thermodilution predicts microvascular dysfunction after ST-elevation myocardial infarction. International Journal of Cardiology, 319. pp. 7-13. ISSN 1874-1754

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2020.06.050

Abstract

Aims: Continuous thermodilution using intracoronary saline infusion is a novel technique able to provide accurate measurements of absolute coronary blood flow and microvascular resistance (Rmicro). The aim of this study was to assess the ability of Rmicro, measured by continuous thermodilution, to predict microvascular dysfunction in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Methods and results: In this prospective observational study, continuous thermodilution was used to measure Rmicro in the culprit coronary artery of 32 patients with STEMI (mean age ± SD, 66 ± 10 years; 78% male) immediately post-primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Concomitant measurements of the index of microvascular resistance (IMR) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were obtained by bolus thermodilution. Microvascular dysfunction was defined as an IMR > 40 or a CFR < 2. Rmicro was higher in patients with microvascular dysfunction based on the predefined thresholds; for IMR: 863 (IQR, 521-1079) vs 474 (IQR, 337-616) Wood units, p = .004 and for CFR: 633 (IQR, 455-1039) vs 474 (IQR, 271-579) Wood units, p = .02. Receiver-operator characteristic analysis demonstrated that Rmicro was predictive of microvascular dysfunction; area under curve (AUC) 0.800 (95% CI: 0.637-0.963, p = .005) for IMR-defined microvascular dysfunction and AUC 0.758 (95% CI: 0.593-0.924, p = .02) for CFR-defined microvascular dysfunction. An Rmicro threshold of greater than 552 Wood units was optimal for predicting microvascular dysfunction defined by IMR > 40. Conclusions: Rmicro is able to identify STEMI patients in whom IMR and CFR measurements suggest significant microvascular dysfunction at the end of primary PCI.

Item Type: Journal Article
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine & Social Care
Depositing User: Ian Walker
Date Deposited: 09 Oct 2020 08:30
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2021 16:06
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705972

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