Changes in physical activity and sedentary behavior in response to COVID-19 and their associations with mental health in 3,052 US adults

Meyer, Jacob and McDowell, Cillian and Lansing, Jeni and Brower, Cassandra and Smith, Lee and Tully, Mark A. and Herring, Matthew (2020) Changes in physical activity and sedentary behavior in response to COVID-19 and their associations with mental health in 3,052 US adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17. p. 6469. ISSN 1660-4601

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186469

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic altered many facets of life. We aimed to evaluate the impact of COVID-19-related public health guidelines on physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior, mental health, and their interrelations. Cross-sectional data were collected from 3052 US adults 3–8 April 2020 (from all 50 states). Participants self-reported pre- and post-COVID-19 levels of moderate and vigorous PA, sitting, and screen time. Currently-followed public health guidelines, stress, loneliness, positive mental health (PMH), social connectedness, and depressive and anxiety symptoms were self-reported. Participants were grouped by meeting US PA guidelines, reporting ≥8 h/day of sitting, or ≥8 h/day of screen time, pre- and post-COVID-19. Overall, 62% of participants were female, with age ranging from 18–24 (16.6% of sample) to 75+ (9.3%). Self-reported PA was lower post-COVID among participants reporting being previously active (mean change: −32.3% [95% CI: −36.3%, −28.1%]) but largely unchanged among previously inactive participants (+2.3% [−3.5%, +8.1%]). No longer meeting PA guidelines and increased screen time were associated with worse depression, loneliness, stress, and PMH (p < 0.001). Self-isolation/quarantine was associated with higher depressive and anxiety symptoms compared to social distancing (p < 0.001). Maintaining and enhancing physical activity participation and limiting screen time increases during abrupt societal changes may mitigate the mental health consequences.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: COVID-19, USA, physical activity, screen time, sitting time, sedentary, mental health, public health, depression, anxiety, loneliness
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
COVID-19 Research Collection
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 03 Sep 2020 09:36
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2021 18:52
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705843

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