Bibliometric Analysis of Early COVID-19 Research: The Top 50 Cited Papers

ElHawary, Hassan and Salimi, Ali and Diab, Nermin and Smith, Lee (2020) Bibliometric Analysis of Early COVID-19 Research: The Top 50 Cited Papers. Infectious Diseases: Research and Treatment, 13. pp. 1-5. ISSN 1178-6337

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1177/1178633720962935

Abstract

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic is rapidly evolving with the number of cases exponentially rising. The research scientific community has reacted promptly as evidenced by an outstanding number of COVID-19 related publications. As the number of scientific publications rapidly rises, there is a need to dissect the factors that lead to highly impactful publications. To that end, the present paper summarizes the characteristics of the top 50 cited COVID-19-related publications that emerged early during the pandemic. Methods: A systematic search of the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar was performed, using keywords related to COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19. Two independent authors reviewed all the search results, screening for the top 50 cited COVID-19-related articles. Inclusion criteria comprised any publication on COVID-19 or the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Data extracted included the type of study, journal, number of citations, number of authors, country of publication, and study content. Results: As of May 29th, the top 50 cited articles were cited 63849 times during the last four months. On average, 14 authors contributed to each publication. Over half of the identified articles were published in only three journals. Furthermore, 42% and 26% of the identified articles were retrospective case series and correspondence/viewpoints, respectively, while only one article was a randomized controlled trial. In terms of content, almost half (48%) of the identified publications reported clinical/radiological findings while only seven out of the 50 articles investigated potential treatments. Conclusion: By highlighting the characteristics of the top 50 cited COVID-19-related articles, the authors hope to disseminate information that could assist researchers to identify the important topics, study characteristics, and gaps in the literature.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: COVID-19, Bibliometric Analysis, Evidence-based research
Faculty: COVID-19 Research Collection
Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2020 09:04
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2021 11:34
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705636

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