Therapeutic effects of methylphenidate for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children with borderline intellectual functioning or intellectual disability: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Sun, Cheuk-Kwan and Tseng, Ping-Tao and Wu, Ching-Kuan and Li, Dian-Jeng and Chen, Tien-Yu and Stubbs, Brendon and Carvalho, Andre F. and Chen, Yen-Wen and Lin, Pao-Yen and Cheng, Yu-Shian and Wu, Ming-Kung (2019) Therapeutic effects of methylphenidate for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children with borderline intellectual functioning or intellectual disability: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Scientific Reports, 9 (1). p. 15908. ISSN 2045-2322

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-52205-6

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently co-occurs with intellectual disability in children, and may further compromise learning. Methylphenidate is a first-line treatment for ADHD, however no previous meta-analysis has evaluated its overall efficacy for ADHD in children with comorbid intellectual disability (ID) or borderline intellectual functioning. The PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL and ScienceDirect databases were systematically searched from inception through 2018/7/15 for clinical studies that investigated the effects of methylphenidate in children with ADHD and ID. A random-effects model meta-analysis was used for data synthesis. Eight studies (average Jadad score = 2.5) enrolling 242 participants receiving methylphenidate and 181 participants receiving placebo were included. The meta-analysis showed that methylphenidate led to a significant improvement in ADHD symptoms relative to placebo (Hedges’ g = 0.878, p < 0.001). Meta-regression analysis pointed to an association between the dose of methylphenidate and overall improvement in ADHD severity (slope = 1.334, p < 0.001). Finally, there was no significant difference in drop-out rate [odds ratio (OR) = 1.679, p = 0.260] or rate of treatment discontinuation due to adverse events (OR = 4.815, p = 0.053) between subjects receiving methylphenidate and those taking placebos. Our study suggests that methylphenidate retains its efficacy in children with ADHD and borderline intellectual functioning or ID.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: deficit hyperactivity disorder, mentally retarded children, rating scale, retardation, ADHD, adolescents, efficacy, trial, fenfluramine, management
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine & Social Care
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2020 09:55
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2020 09:56
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705593

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