Prevalence and correlates of exercise addiction in the presence vs absence of indicated eating disorders

Trott, Mike and Yang, Lin and Jackson, Sarah E. and Firth, Joseph and Gillvray, Claire and Stubbs, Brendon and Smith, Lee (2020) Prevalence and correlates of exercise addiction in the presence vs absence of indicated eating disorders. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, 2. p. 84. ISSN 2624-9367

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fspor.2020.00084

Abstract

Despite the many benefits of regular, sustained exercise, there is evidence that exercise can become addictive, to the point where the exerciser experiences negative physiological and psychological symptoms, including withdrawal symptoms upon cessation, training through injury and the detriment of social relationships. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that the aetiology of exercise addiction is different depending on the presence or absence of eating disorders. The aim of this study was to explore what extent was eating disorder status, body dysmorphic disorder, reasons for exercise, social media use and fitness instructor status were associated with exercise addiction, and to determine differences according to eating disorder status. The key findings showed that the aetiology of exercise addiction differed according to eating disorder status, with variables including social media use, exercise motivation and ethnicity being uniquely correlated with exercise addiction only in populations with indicated eating disorders. Furthermore, body dysmorphic disorder was highly prevalent in subjects without indicated eating disorders, and could be a primary condition in which exercise addiction is a symptom. It is recommended that clinicians and practitioners working with patients who present with symptoms of exercise addiction should be screened for eating disorders and body dysmorphic disorder before treatments are considered.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: exercise addiction, eating disorder, correlates
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 20 May 2020 13:14
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2020 13:08
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705549

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