Juvenile sexual offending in Ghana: Prevalence, risks and correlates

Boakye, Kofi E. (2020) Juvenile sexual offending in Ghana: Prevalence, risks and correlates. Child Abuse and Neglect, 101. p. 104318. ISSN 1873-7757

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2019.104318

Abstract

Background Sexual violence research in Africa is overwhelmingly focused on victims with little attention given to perpetrators. In the case of juveniles who perpetrate sexual violence the evidence is mainly from studies in Western industrialized societies. The consequence is that interventions for juveniles who commit sexual violence in Ghana and Africa lack evidential basis. Objectives This study investigates prevalence, correlates and risk factors for juvenile sexual offending. Participants and setting The study utilised a sample of 264 male juveniles aged 12–18 in schools and young offender institutions in southern Ghana. Method Prevalence of the juvenile sexual offending was estimated based on self-report. Odds ratio (OR) was used to calculate the risk for the juveniles engaging in sexual violence. The predictive significance of variables within various domains was estimated using logistic regression models. Results Results show that about a fifth (16.7 %) of the juveniles have committed a sexual offense. A deviant sexual tendency such as paying for sex constitutes an important risk marker for juvenile sexual offending (OR: 6.41, 95 % CI [3.28–12.54]). Risk factors for juvenile sexual offending are concentrated in the family domain with parental neglect (OR: 4.55, 95 % CI [2.46–9.44]), parental conflict (OR: 4.45, 95 % CI [2.35–8.44]) alcoholic parents (OR: 3.07, 95 % CI [1.66–5.69] parental abuse (OR: 2.90, 95 % CI [1.63–5.19]), and deprived family economic condition (OR: 2.64, 95 % CI [1.47–4.75]) emerging as statistically significant factors. Conclusion Prevalence estimates of juvenile sexual offending are influenced by types and number of questions with multiple questions eliciting more accurate estimates than a single item measure. Risk factors for juvenile sexual offending vary based on context. Interventions to reduce juvenile sexual violence must be informed by evidence from the social context.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Juvenile sexual violence, Sexual offending, Risk factors, Sexual abuse in Africa
Faculty: Faculty of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences
Depositing User: Lisa Blanshard
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2020 10:24
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2021 14:05
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705382

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