The impact of ward climate on staff perceptions of barriers to research‐driven service changes on mental health wards: A cross‐sectional study

Laker, Caroline and Cella, Matteo and Callard, Felicity and Wykes, Til (2020) The impact of ward climate on staff perceptions of barriers to research‐driven service changes on mental health wards: A cross‐sectional study. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 27 (3). pp. 281-295. ISSN 1365-2850

Full text not available from this repository.
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12577

Abstract

Introduction: To create successful change programmes for mental health wards, it is necessary to understand which aspects of ward climate prevent change. Question: Does ward climate influence mental health nurse's perceptions of barriers to change? Method: Random‐effects models were used to test whether the following ward climate variables influenced the outcome measure “staff perceptions of barriers to change” (VOCALISE) and its subscales (powerlessness/confidence/demotivation): (a) Perceptions of ward climate (VOTE: subscales included work intensity/job satisfaction/interaction anxiety). (b) Ward climate indicators (incidents/detention under the Mental Health Act (2007)/staffing/bed pressure). As known predictors of VOCALISE, burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and occupational status were included in the models. Results: Perceptions of ward climate (VOTE), incidents, temporary staff, occupational status and burnout significantly and negatively affected perceptions of barriers to change (VOCALISE). Staff with low job satisfaction (VOTE) and high interaction anxiety (VOTE) also had low confidence (VOCALISE). Staff with low job satisfaction (VOTE) were also demotivated (VOCALISE). Discussion: Ward climate is an important predictor of how staff regard service changes in mental health wards. Implications for practice: Staff perceptions of ward climate and barriers to change should be assessed ahead of service changes to identify pressures that impede progress and lower morale.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: acute mental health, health services delivery, organizational change/development, staff perceptions
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine & Social Care
Depositing User: Lisa Blanshard
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2020 10:11
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2021 16:06
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705381

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item