What is the evidence that can inform the implementation of a preceptorship scheme for general practice nurses, and what is the evidence for the benefits of such a scheme?: A literature review and synthesis

Walker, Susan H. and Norris, Kellie (2020) What is the evidence that can inform the implementation of a preceptorship scheme for general practice nurses, and what is the evidence for the benefits of such a scheme?: A literature review and synthesis. Nurse Education Today, 86. p. 104327. ISSN 1532-2793

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2019.104327

Abstract

Objectives: This is a literature review of the published evidence of the benefits and suggested structure of preceptorship programmes for General Practice Nursing, with the aim of informing General Practices and networks who are instituting preceptorship programmes. Design & data sources: A literature search was carried out in the CINAHL Plus database of English language papers from the year 2000–2019 using the search terms; (Precept* or mentor*) AND (“community practice” OR “primary care” or “general practice” or “new GPN” or “new general practice nurse” or “nurse new to general practice” or “induction GPN” or “GPN”). Review method: A literature review and narrative synthesis of the evidence. Results: Our searches produced twelve papers. Seven papers reported on single preceptorship programmes in General Practice or primary care, with qualitative or quantitative evaluation of their effects. Three qualitative papers reported participant experience of preceptorship, or discussed the learning needs that preceptorship must address. Two literature reviews reported the evidence for preceptorship in General Practice or nurse practitioner programmes. Conclusion: The quality of the evidence on General Practice Nurse preceptorship is low. There is a lack of robust evidence on the effects, and the benefits. These should be evaluated as preceptorship programmes are implemented. The limited available evidence suggests that a structured preceptorship programme, of more than 4 months duration, which allows the development of peer-to-peer support, is a good model for General Practice Nurse preceptorship. The involvement of doctors and the wider practice team is essential for the success of such a programme. Preceptors require training and support in the role. General Practice Nurse preceptorship should support the development of existing professional competencies, including the ability to make real-time autonomous clinical decisions. The financial costs, and cost of time away from clinical care, should be ameliorated as far as possible, when instituting a national General Practice Nurse preceptorship programme.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Preceptorship, Mentors, Family practice, General practice, Primary health care, United Kingdom, Australia
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine & Social Care
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2020 09:42
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2021 11:35
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705079

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