Becoming self harm, theodicy and neo‐primitive organizing – necessary evil or evil of necessity?

Gray, Lloyd (2008) Becoming self harm, theodicy and neo‐primitive organizing – necessary evil or evil of necessity? Culture and Organization, 14 (2). pp. 151-169. ISSN 1477-2760

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14759550802079291

Abstract

The self has emerged as integral to how we comprehend the ethos of contemporary post‐bureaucratic – or what will be termed neo‐primitive – organizing. In juxtaposition, and immanent, are multiple requirements for the self to be harmed, in various ways, for the purposes of achieving organizational progress. This post‐structuralist composition explores how these requirements are inscribed, and desired, in different ways during ontotheological and neo‐primitive processes of sacrifice, neomasochism, simulacra, exclusion, and theodicy. These processes permit the possibility that the harming of the self can be justified (utility/include) and also discounted (diminish/exclude). It is argued, that relations of self and harm constantly arise, and change, during non‐integratable affects and events of radical alteration; namely where self questioning (loss of self) and questioning of self (identity) occur. However, it is argued, neo‐primitive organizing constantly refuses ethical responsiveness to self harm, through the inscriptive superimposition of exchange relations of lack, debt and guilt.

Item Type: Journal Article
Faculty: ARCHIVED Lord Ashcroft International Business School (until September 2018)
Depositing User: Repository Admin
Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2012 10:34
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2021 16:18
URI: https://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/263335

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