Construction and physiochemical characterisation of a multi-composite, potential oral vaccine delivery system (VDS)

Pettit, Marie W. and Dyer, Paul D. R. and Mitchell, John C. and Griffiths, Peter C. and Alexander, Bruce D. and Cattoz, Beatrice N. and Heenan, Richard K. and King, Stephen M. and Schweins, Ralf and Pullen, Frank and Wicks, Stephen R. and Richardson, Simon C. W. (2014) Construction and physiochemical characterisation of a multi-composite, potential oral vaccine delivery system (VDS). International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 468 (1-2). pp. 264-271. ISSN 1873-3476

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2014.03.046

Abstract

An increasing human population requires a secure food supply and a cost effective, oral vaccine delivery system for livestock would help facilitate this end. Recombinant antigen adsorbed onto silica beads and coated with myristic acid, was released (∼15% (w/v)) over 24 h at pH 8.8. At pH 2, the myristic acid acted as an enteric coating, protecting the antigen from a variety of proteases. The antigen adsorbed onto silica particles, coated in myristic acid had a conserved secondary structure (measured by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy) following its pH-triggered release. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to measure the thickness of the adsorbed antigen, finding that its adsorbed conformation was slightly greater than its solution radius of gyration, i.e. 120-160 Å. The addition of myristic acid led to a further increase in particle size, with scattering data consistent with an acid thickness slightly greater than a monolayer of fully extended alkyl chains and a degree of hydration of around 50%. Whilst adsorbed onto the silica and coated in myristic acid, the protein was stable over 14 days at 42 °C, indicating a reduced need for cold chain storage. These data indicate that further investigation is warranted into the development of this technology.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Vaccine, Enteric, Immobilisation, Silica, Synthetic protein, Mesoporous silica, Drug-delivery, Nanoparticles, Identification
Faculty: ARCHIVED Faculty of Science & Technology (until September 2018)
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2020 10:00
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2020 10:00
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705094

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