A comparative meta-analysis of the prevalence of exercise addiction in adults with and without indicated eating disorders

Trott, Mike and Jackson, Sarah E. and Firth, Joseph and Jacob, Louis and Grabovac, Igor and Mistry, Amit and Stubbs, Brendon and Smith, Lee (2020) A comparative meta-analysis of the prevalence of exercise addiction in adults with and without indicated eating disorders. Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity. ISSN 1590-1262

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40519-019-00842-1

Abstract

Background: Exercise addiction is associated with multiple adverse outcomes and can be classified as co-occurring with an eating disorder, or a primary condition with no indication of eating disorders. We conducted a meta-analysis exploring the prevalence of exercise addiction in adults with and without indicated eating disorders. Methods: A systematic review of major databases and grey literature was undertaken from inception to 30/04/2019. Studies reporting prevalence of exercise addiction with and without indicated eating disorders in adults were identified. A random effect meta-analysis was undertaken, calculating odds ratios for exercise addiction with versus without indicated eating disorders. Results: Nine studies with a total sample of 2140 participants (mean age = 25.06; 70.6% female) were included. Within these, 1732 participants did not show indicated eating disorders (mean age = 26.4; 63.0% female) and 408 had indicated eating disorders (mean age = 23.46; 79.2% female). The odds ratio for exercise addiction in populations with versus without indicated eating disorders was 3.71 (95%CI 2.00-6.89; I2 = 81; p=<0.001). Exercise addiction prevalence in both populations differed according to the measurement instrument used. Discussion: Exercise addiction occurs more than three and a half times as often as a comorbidity to an eating disorder than in people without an indicated eating disorder. The creation of a measurement tool able to identify exercise addiction risk in both populations would benefit researchers and practitioners by easily classifying samples.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Exercise addiction, Exercise dependence, Addiction, Pathological exercise, Eating disorders, Disordered eating
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2019 16:40
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2020 15:56
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/705056

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