Cannabis use and physical activity among 89,777 adolescents aged 12-15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries

Ashdown-Franks, Garcia and Sabiston, Catherine and Vancampfort, Davy and Smith, Lee and Firth, Joseph and Solmi, Marco and Veronese, Nicola and Stubbs, Brendon and Koyanagi, Ai (2019) Cannabis use and physical activity among 89,777 adolescents aged 12-15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. ISSN 1879-0046

[img] Text
Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 4 November 2020.
Available under the following license: Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (140kB) | Request a copy
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.107584

Abstract

Background: Cannabis legalization and use are increasing globally, however, little is known about associations between cannabis use and other health behaviors, such as physical activity (PA). Importantly, the extent to which cannabis use is associated with PA in adolescents is yet to be explored in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where there may be unique sociodemographic and environmental characteristics compared with high-income countries. Therefore, this study examined the association between PA and cannabis use among adolescents in 21 LMICs using data from the 2010-2016 Global School-based Student Health Survey. Methods: A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed among a final sample of 89,777 adolescents (49.2% females) aged 12-15 years with a mean (SD) age of 13.7 (0.9) years. Results: The overall prevalence of past (i.e., in lifetime but not in past 30 days) and current (in past 30 days) cannabis use were 1.0% and 2.9% respectively, while the prevalence of adequate PA in the past week (7 days/week of 60 minutes of PA) was 16.6%. The prevalence of adequate levels of PA in past and current cannabis use was 7.3% and 6.9%, respectively. Current and past cannabis use (vs. never) were associated with a significant 0.62 (95% CI=0.41-0.94) and 0.43 (95%CI=0.30-0.63) times lower odds for achieving adequate levels of PA, respectively. Conclusion: The results underscore the high prevalence of low PA among adolescents in LMICs, and emphasize the need to understand behavioral factors that may affect PA levels, such as cannabis use, when designing interventions to improve health.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Cannabis, Drugs, Physical Activity, Exercise
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
Depositing User: Lee Smith
Date Deposited: 13 Aug 2019 09:46
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2019 16:07
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/704634

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item