Comparison of Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA) versus a Multi-frequency Bioelectrical Impedance (InBody 770) Device for Body Composition Assessment after a 4-Week Hypoenergetic Diet

Antonio, Jose and Kenyon, Madaline and Ellerbroek, Anya and Carson, Cassandra and Burgess, Victoria and Tyler-Palmer, Denvyr and Mike, Jonathan and Roberts, Justin D. and Angeli, Gerseli and Peacock, Corey A. (2019) Comparison of Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA) versus a Multi-frequency Bioelectrical Impedance (InBody 770) Device for Body Composition Assessment after a 4-Week Hypoenergetic Diet. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology, 4 (2). p. 23. ISSN 2411-5142

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4020023

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to compare two different methods of assessing body composition (i.e., a multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (MF-BIA) and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) over a four-week treatment period in exercise-trained men and women. Subjects were instructed to reduce their energy intake while maintaining the same exercise regimen for a period of four weeks. Pre and post assessments for body composition (i.e., fat-free mass, fat mass, percent body fat) were determined via the MF-BIA and DXA. On average, subjects reduced their energy intake by ~18 percent. The MF-BIA underestimated fat mass and percentage body fat and overestimated fat-free mass in comparison to the DXA. However, when assessing the change in fat mass, fat-free mass or percent body fat, there were no statistically significant differences between the MF-BIA vs. DXA. Overall, the change in percent body fat using the DXA vs. the MF-BIA was −1.3 ± 0.9 and −1.4 ± 1.8, respectively. Our data suggest that when tracking body composition over a period of four weeks, the MF-BIA may be a viable alternative to the DXA in exercise-trained men and women.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: exercise, fat mass, diet, body composition, fat-free mass, exercise-trained
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 23 May 2019 15:59
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2019 16:08
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/704360

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