Care After REsuscitation: Implementation of the United Kingdom's First Dedicated Multidisciplinary Follow-Up Program for Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Mion, Marco and Al-Janabi, Firas and Islam, Shahed and Magee, Neil and Balasubramanian, Rajesh and Watson, Noel and Potter, Matthew and Karamasis, Grigoris V. and Harding, Jane and Seligman, Henry and Dulai, Rajdip and Maccarroni, Maria and Toff, William and Moulaert, Veronique and Polderman, Kees and Davies, John R. and Keeble, Thomas R. (2019) Care After REsuscitation: Implementation of the United Kingdom's First Dedicated Multidisciplinary Follow-Up Program for Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management. ISSN 2153-7933

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1089/ther.2018.0048

Abstract

Survival rates after cardiac arrest (CA) are increasing, with more patients and their families living with the psychological consequences of surviving a sudden CA. The currently available neuropsychological assessment tools and therapies were not designed for CA, and may be inadequate. The Essex Cardiothoracic Centre set up the United Kingdom's first dedicated multidisciplinary “Care After REsuscitation” (CARE) service, offering CA survivors and their caregivers systematic psychological, cognitive, and specialized medical support for the first 6 months after CA. Twenty-one patients were recruited into the CARE pilot service evaluation. Patients' health at hospital discharge was poor; however, by 6 months all components (except general health) had improved significantly, and were close to that experienced by “healthy” individuals. Five (26%) required referral to a psychiatrist, with all 5 (26%) subsequently being diagnosed with moderate-to-severe depression, and 3 (16%) with comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder. Our study demonstrates a large unmet clinical need in general and neuropsychological assessment, and our results suggest that offering appropriate and prompt specialist diagnosis and therapies leads to an improvement in health at 6 months.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), neuro-psychological disability, follow up, multi-disciplinary team (MDT)
Faculty: Faculty of Medical Science
Depositing User: Ian Walker
Date Deposited: 20 Feb 2019 09:45
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2019 11:14
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/704127

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