Are Toll-like receptors potential drug targets for atherosclerosis? Evidence from genetic studies to date

Nelson, Christopher P. and Erridge, Clett (2019) Are Toll-like receptors potential drug targets for atherosclerosis? Evidence from genetic studies to date. Immunogenetics, 71 (1). pp. 1-11. ISSN 1432-1211

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00251-018-1092-0

Abstract

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering, most notably via statin therapy, has successfully reduced the burden of coronary artery disease (CAD) in recent decades. However, the residual risk remaining even after aggressive lipid lowering has renewed interest in alternative targets. Anti-inflammatory drugs are thought to have much potential in this context, but side effects associated with long-term use of conventional anti-inflammatories, such as NSAIDs and glucocorticoids, preclude their use as preventive agents for CAD. Evidence from epidemiological studies and murine models of atherosclerosis suggests that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may have utility as targets for more focused anti-inflammatories, but it remains unclear if this pathway is causally related to CAD in man. Here, we review recent insight into this question gained from genetic studies of cardiovascular risk and innate immune function, focussing on the potential of Mendelian randomisation approaches based on intracellular-signalling pathways to identify and prioritise targets for drug development.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Toll-like receptors, Cardiovascular disease, Genetics, Mendelian randomisation, Drug target discovery
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic User
Depositing User: Symplectic User
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2018 12:30
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2019 14:59
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/703652

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