Identification of marine Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas for penguins around the South Shetland Islands and South Orkney Islands

Dias, Maria P. and Carneiro, Ana P. B. and Warwick-Evans, Victoria and Harris, Colin and Lorenz, Katharina and Lascelles, Ben G. and Clewlow, Harriet L. and Dunn, Michael J. and Hinke, Jefferson T. and Kim, Jeong-Hoon and Kokubun, Nobuo and Manco, Fabrizio and Ratcliffe, Norman and Santos, Mercedes and Takahashi, Akinori and Trivelpiece, Wayne and Trathan, Philip N. (2018) Identification of marine Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas for penguins around the South Shetland Islands and South Orkney Islands. Ecology and Evolution, 8 (21). pp. 10520-10529. ISSN 2045-7758

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.4519

Abstract

Aim: To provide a method of analysing penguin tracking data to identify priority at-sea areas for seabird conservation (marine IBAs), based on pre-existing approaches for flying seabirds but revised according to the specific ecology of Pygoscelis penguin species. Location: Waters around the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland and South Orkney Archipelagos (FAO Subareas 48.1 and 48.2) Methods: We made key improvements to the pre-existing protocol for identifying marine IBAs that include refining the track interpolation method, and revision of parameters for the kernel analysis (smoothing factor and utilization distribution) using sensitivity tests. We applied the revised method to 24 datasets of tracking data on penguins (three species, seven colonies and three different breeding stages – incubation, brood and crèche). Results: We identified 5 new marine IBAs for seabirds in the study area, estimated to hold ca. 600,000 adult penguins. Main conclusions: The results demonstrate the efficacy of a new method for the designation of a network of marine IBAs in Antarctic waters for penguins based on tracking data, which can contribute to an evidence-based, precautionary, management framework for krill fisheries.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Antarctica, Conservation, Marine Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas, Penguins, Tracking data
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Engineering
Depositing User: Mr Fabrizio Manco
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2018 15:36
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2019 16:08
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/703604

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