Prevalence and Causes of Vision Loss in High-Income Countries and in Eastern and Central Europe in 2015: Magnitude, Temporal Trends, and Projections

Bourne, Rupert R. A. and Jonas, Jost B. and Bron, Alain M. and Cicinelli, Maria V. and Das, Aditi and Flaxman, Seth R. and Friedman, David and Keeffe, Jill and Kempen, John H. and Leasher, Janet and Limburg, Hans and Naidoo, Kovin and Pesudovs, Konrad and Peto, Tunde and Saaddine, Jinan and Silvester, Alex and Tahhan, Nina and Taylor, Hugh R. and Varma, Rohit and Wong, Tien Y. and Resnikoff, Serge (2018) Prevalence and Causes of Vision Loss in High-Income Countries and in Eastern and Central Europe in 2015: Magnitude, Temporal Trends, and Projections. British Journal of Ophthalmology, 102 (5). pp. 575-585. ISSN 1468-2079

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2017-311258

Abstract

Background: Within a surveillance of the prevalence and causes of vision impairment in high-income regions and Central/Eastern Europe, we update figures through 2015 and forecast expected values in 2020. Methods: Based on a systematic review of medical literature, prevalence of blindness, moderate and severe vision impairment (MSVI), mild vision impairment and presbyopia were estimated for 1990, 2010, 2015, and 2020. Results: Age-standardized prevalence of blindness and MSVI for all ages decreased from 1990 to 2015 from 0.26% (0.10-0.46) to 0.15% (0.06-0.26), and from 1.74% (0.76-2.94) to 1.27% (0.55-2.17), respectively. In 2015, the number of individuals affected by blindness, MSVI and mild vision impairment ranged from 70,000, 630,000 and 610,000, respectively, in Australasia to 980,000, 7.46 million and 7.25 million, respectively, in North America and 1.16 million, 9.61 million and 9.47 million in Western Europe. In 2015, cataract was the most common cause for blindness, followed by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, uncorrected refractive error, diabetic retinopathy, and cornea-related disorders, with declining burden from cataract and AMD over time. Uncorrected refractive error was the leading cause of MSVI. Conclusions: While continuing to advance control of cataract and AMD as the leading causes of blindness remains a high priority, overcoming barriers to uptake of refractive error services would address approximately half of the MSVI burden. New data on burden of presbyopia identify this entity as an important public health problem in this population. Additional research on better treatments, better implementation with existing tools and ongoing surveillance of the problem are needed.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: global burden of disease study, vision loss expert group, vision loss, blindness, vision impairment, refractive error, cataract, glaucoma, macular degeneration, epidemiology
Faculty: Faculty of Medical Science
Depositing User: Ian Walker
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2018 12:34
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2019 11:17
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/702797

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