Native ladybird decline caused by the invasive harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis: evidence from a long term field study.

Brown, Peter M. J. and Roy, Helen E. (2018) Native ladybird decline caused by the invasive harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis: evidence from a long term field study. Insect Conservation and Diversity, 11 (3). pp. 230-239. ISSN 1752-4598

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/icad.12266

Abstract

1. Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is regarded as an invasive non-native species in Europe, where it has been spreading rapidly since the early years of the 21st century. 2. This study examines changes in ladybird communities at four sites (two lime tree sites, one pine tree site and one nettle site) in East Anglia, England, over an 11-year period (2006-2016) following invasion by H. axyridis. 3. Overall, H. axyridis represented 41.5% of all ladybirds sampled (varying from a low of 0.2% (1 of 520 ladybirds at three sites) in 2006 to a high of 70.7% (724 of 1024 at four sites) in 2015) and was over three times more abundant than the second commonest species, Coccinella septempunctata L. The proportion of native ladybirds declined from 99.8% (520 of 521 ladybirds at three sites) in 2006 to 30.7% (383 of 1248 at four sites) in 2016, but H. axyridis dominated only at the lime tree sites and not at the pine or nettle sites. 4. There was a significant negative relationship between H. axyridis and Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) adults at the lime tree sites, but not between H. axyridis and adults of any of the other main ladybird species sampled. Adalia bipunctata adults and Adalia spp. larvae were the only native ladybirds that significantly declined. 5. Our study shows a clear change in the ladybird community on lime trees over an 11 year period in which H. axyridis invaded England. Intraguild predation is hypothesised to be an important driver of the changes observed.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Brown, Peter M.J. and Roy, Helen E. (2017) Native ladybird decline caused by the invasive harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis: evidence from a long term field study. Insect Conservation and Diversity. ISSN 1752-458X, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/icad.12266. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Keywords: Adalia bipunctata, biological control, Coccinellidae, Harmonia axyridis, intraguild predation, invasive species, non-target effects
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology
Depositing User: Dr Peter M.J. Brown
Date Deposited: 09 Oct 2017 13:41
Last Modified: 07 Jan 2019 11:58
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/702257

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