Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower incidence of frailty: A longitudinal cohort study

Veronese, Nicola and Stubbs, Brendon and Noale, Marianna and Solmi, Marco and Rizzoli, Renè and Vaona, Alberto and Demurtas, Jacopo and Crepaldi, Gaetano and Maggi, Stefania (2018) Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower incidence of frailty: A longitudinal cohort study. Clinical Nutrition, 37 (5). pp. 1492-1497. ISSN 1532-1983

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2017.08.028

Abstract

Background & aims: There is a paucity of data investigating the relationship between the Mediterranean diet and frailty, with no data among North American people. We aimed to investigate if adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of frailty in a large cohort of North American people. Methods: This study included subjects at higher risk or having knee osteoarthritis. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using a validated Mediterranean diet score (aMED) as proposed by Panagiotakos and classified into five categories. Frailty was defined using the Study of Osteoporotic Fracture (SOF) index as the presence of ≥2 out of: (i) weight loss ≥5% between baseline and the subsequent follow-up visit; (ii) inability to do five chair stands; (iii) low energy level. Results: During the 8 years follow-up, of the 4421 participants initially included (mean age: 61.2 years, % of females = 58.0), the incidence of frailty was approximately half in those with a higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet (8 for 1000 person years) vs. those with a lower adherence (15 for 1000 persons-years). After adjusting for 10 potential confounders (age, sex, race, body mass index, education, smoking habits, yearly income, physical activity level, Charlson co-morbidity index and daily energy intake), participants with the highest aMED scores were found to have a significant reduction in incident frailty (hazard ratio = 0.71; 95% CIs: 0.50–0.99, p = 0.047) with respect to those in a lower category. Regarding individual components of the Mediterranean diet, low consumption of poultry was found to be associated with higher risk of frailty. Conclusions: A higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower incidence of frailty over an 8-year follow-up period, even after adjusting for potential confounders.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Frailty, Mediterranean diet, Osteoarthritis initiative, Older people
Faculty: ARCHIVED Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education (until September 2018)
Depositing User: Brendon Stubbs
Date Deposited: 02 Oct 2017 15:35
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2019 16:09
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/702231

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