Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with better quality of life: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

Veronese, Nicola and Stubbs, Brendon and Noale, Marianna and Solmi, Marco and Luchini, Claudio and Maggi, Stefania (2016) Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with better quality of life: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104 (5). pp. 1403-1409. ISSN 1938-3207

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.136390

Abstract

Background: The Mediterranean diet has positively influenced various medical conditions, but only a paucity of studies has considered the relation between the Mediterranean diet and quality of life (QOL) among people living in North America. Objective: We investigated whether a higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet (aMED) was associated with better QOL and decreased pain, stiffness, disability, and depression in a large cohort of North Americans from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Design: aMED was evaluated through a validated Mediterranean diet score categorized into quintiles. Outcomes of interest were QOL [assessed with the 12-Item Short-Form Health Outcome Survey (SF-12)]; disability, pain, and stiffness [assessed in both knees with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC)]; and depressive symptoms [assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)]. Results: Of the 4470 participants (2605 women; mean age: 61.3 y), those with a higher aMED had significantly more favorable scores on all outcomes investigated (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). After adjustment for potential confounders in linear regression analyses, a higher aMED was significantly associated with a higher SF-12 physical composite scale value (β: 0.10; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.15; P < 0.0001), lower WOMAC scores (except for stiffness), and lower CES-D scores (β: −0.05; 95% CI: −0.09, −0.01; P = 0.01). An adjusted logistic regression analysis, taking as reference those in the 2 highest quintiles of the aMED score, confirmed these findings. Conclusion: Higher aMED is associated with better QOL and decreased pain, disability, and depressive symptoms.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Mediterranean diet, depression, quality of life osteoarthritis initiative, pain, disability
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education (for research post September 2011)
Depositing User: Brendon Stubbs
Date Deposited: 04 Nov 2016 08:58
Last Modified: 21 Feb 2019 11:57
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/700884

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