Aftereffects for face attributes with different natural variability: Children are more adaptable than adolescents

Hills, Peter J. and Holland, Andrew M. and Lewis, Michael B. (2010) Aftereffects for face attributes with different natural variability: Children are more adaptable than adolescents. Cognitive Development, 25 (3). pp. 278-289. ISSN 0885-2014

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2010.01.002

Abstract

Adults can be adapted to a particular facial distortion in which both eyes are shifted symmetrically (Robbins, R., McKone, E., & Edwards, M. (2007). Aftereffects for face attributes with different natural variability: Adapter position effects and neural models. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 33, 570–592), but they do not show as great adaptation to an asymmetrical eye distortion. We adapted children and adolescents to symmetrical and asymmetrical eye distortions and measured the aftereffects. Children (aged 6–12, mean age 9 years) showed larger aftereffects than adolescents (aged 13–18, mean age 15 years) and demonstrated aftereffects of a similar magnitude for both asymmetrical and symmetrical distortions. Adolescents only showed aftereffects for symmetrical distortions. We propose that children may have a more flexible face norm and neural responses that allow a broader range of adapted states compared to adolescents.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Face perception, Adaptation, Face Distortion Aftereffect, Perceptual narrowing
Faculty: ARCHIVED Faculty of Science & Technology (until September 2018)
Depositing User: Repository Admin
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2015 10:31
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2019 16:04
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/339049

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