The Digestive Tract of Cephalopods: Toward Non-invasive In vivo Monitoring of Its Physiology

Ponte, Giovanna and Sykes, Antonio V. and Cooke, Gavan M. and Almansa, Eduardo and Andrews, Paul L. R. (2017) The Digestive Tract of Cephalopods: Toward Non-invasive In vivo Monitoring of Its Physiology. Frontiers in Physiology, 8. ISSN 1664-042X

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2017.00403

Abstract

Ensuring the health and welfare of animals in research is paramount, and the normal functioning of the digestive tract is essential for both. Here we critically assess non- or minimally-invasive techniques which may be used to assess a cephalopod’s digestive tract functionality to inform health monitoring. We focus on: (i) predatory response as an indication of appetitive drive; (ii) body weight assessment and interpretation of deviations (e.g., digestive gland weight loss is disproportionate to body weight loss in starvation); (iii) oro-anal transit time requiring novel, standardized techniques to facilitate comparative studies of species and diets; (iv) defecation frequency and analysis of fecal color (diet dependent) and composition (parasites, biomarkers, and cytology); (v) digestive tract endoscopy, but passage of the esophagus through the brain is a technical challenge; (vi) high resolution ultrasound that offers the possibility of imaging the morphology of the digestive tract (e.g., food distribution, indigestible residues, obstruction) and recording contractile activity; (vii) needle biopsy (with ultrasound guidance) as a technique for investigating digestive gland biochemistry and pathology without the death of the animal. These techniques will inform the development of physiologically based assessments of health and the impact of experimental procedures. Although intended for use in the laboratory they are equally applicable to cephalopods in public display and aquaculture.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: cephalopods, welare, digestion
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology
Depositing User: Dr Gavan Cooke
Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2017 07:50
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2017 07:50
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/701960

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