Accelerometery and Heart Rate Responses of Professional Fast-Medium Bow-lers in One-Day and Multi-Day Cricket

Johnstone, James and Hughes, Gerwyn and Mitchell, Andrew and Ford, Paul and Watson, Tim and Duffield, Rob and Gordon, Dan and Roberts, Justin and Garrett, Andrew (2017) Accelerometery and Heart Rate Responses of Professional Fast-Medium Bow-lers in One-Day and Multi-Day Cricket. Journal of Sport Science and Medicine, 16. pp. 311-317. ISSN 1303-2968

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Abstract

The physical demands of fast-medium bowling are increasingly being recognised, yet comparative exploration of the differing demands between competitive formats (i.e. one-day [OD] versus multi-day [MD] matches) remain minimal. The aim of this study was to describe in-match physiological profiles of professional fast-medium bowlers from England across different versions of competitive matches using a multivariable wearable monitoring device. Seven professional cricket fast-medium bowlers wore the BioharnessTM monitoring device during matches, over three sea-sons (>80 hours in-match). Heart Rate (HR) and Acceleromety (ACC) was compared across match types (OD, MD) and differ-ent in-match activity states (Bowling, Between over bowling, Fielding). Peak acceleration during OD bowling was significantly higher in comparison to MD cricket ([OD vs. MD] 234.1 ± 57.9 vs 226.6 ± 32.9 ct·episode-1, p < 0.05, ES = 0.11-0.30). Data for ACC were also higher during OD than MD fielding activities (p < 0.01, ES = 0.11-.30). OD bowling stimulated higher mean HR responses (143 ± 14 vs 137 ± 16 beats·min-1, p < 0.05, ES = 0.21) when compared to MD matches. This increase in OD crick-et was evident for both between over (129 ± 9 vs 120 ± 13 beats·min-1,p < 0.01, ES = 0.11-0.50) and during fielding (115 ± 12 vs 106 ± 12 beats·min-1, p < 0.01, ES = 0.36) activity. The increased HR and ACC evident in OD matches suggest greater acute physical loads than MD formats. Therefore, use of wearable technology and the findings provided give a valuable appreciation of the differences in match loads, and thus required physiological preparation and recovery in fast-medium bowlers.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Wearable monitoring, Physiological profiles, in-match data, technology
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology
Depositing User: Dr James Johnstone
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2017 10:58
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2017 11:01
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/701835

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