The use of social networking technology in the promotion and scaling up of complex global health initiatives

Baines, L.S. and Jindal, R.M. and Mettha, K. (2015) The use of social networking technology in the promotion and scaling up of complex global health initiatives. Journal of Healthcare, Science and the Humanities. ISSN 2159-8800

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Official URL: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1118/

Abstract

Western medicine has a long tradition of humanitarian service in low resource countries and in crisis and disaster situations. However, advances in social network technology have dramatically changed the manner in which global health services are delivered. A new generation of healthcare professionals, modeled as social entrepreneurs, utilizing collaborative and nonprofit models is establishing relationships with healthcare professionals in host countries, to actively track early disease detection, scaling up of services and research. Oftentimes, technology allows healthcare professionals to contribute to these efforts remotely and without detracting from their routine clinical work as well as facilitating more flexible pathways for global health training in postgraduate education. This paper examines the limitations and opportunities for the utilization of social networking technology, including health care workers as social entrepreneurs, in early disease detection and in scaling up of services and research. Key words: global healthcare entrepreneurs, global burden of disease, social network technology, low resource countries, scaling up, capacity building, social enterprise

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: social networks, mobile devices, global health
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education (for research post September 2011)
Depositing User: Unnamed user with email lyndsay.baines@anglia.ac.uk
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2017 11:04
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2017 11:04
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/701756

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