Associations between prolonged sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with cardiometabolic risk in 10-14-year-old children: The HAPPY study.

Bailey, D.P. and Charma, S.J. and Ploetz, T. and Savory, L.A. and Kerr, C.J. (2016) Associations between prolonged sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with cardiometabolic risk in 10-14-year-old children: The HAPPY study. Journal of Sport Sciences, 28.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2016.1260150

Abstract

This study examines the association between prolonged sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with cardiometabolic risk in 10-14-year-old children. This cross-sectional design study analysed accelerometry-determined sedentary behaviour and physical activity collected over 7 days from 111 (66 girls) UK schoolchildren. Objective outcome measures included waist circumference, fasting lipids, fasting glucose, blood pressure, and cardiorespiratory fitness. Logistic regression was used for the main data analysis. After adjustment for confounders, the odds of having hypertriglyceridaemia (P = 0.03) and an increased clustered cardiometabolic risk score (P = 0.05) were significantly higher in children who engaged in more prolonged sedentary bouts per day. The number of breaks in sedentary time per day was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor, but longer mean duration of daily breaks in sedentary time were associated with a lower odds of having abdominal adiposity (P = 0.04) and elevated diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01). These associations may be mediated by engagement in light activity. This study provides evidence that avoiding periods of prolonged uninterrupted sedentary time may be important for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk in children.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: sedentary bout, sedentary time, physical activity, cardiometabolic risk, cardiorespiratory fitness
Faculty: Faculty of Medical Science
Depositing User: Dr Catherine J Kerr
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2017 10:34
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2017 09:02
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/701457

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