Socially Important Faces Are Processed Preferentially to Other Familiar and Unfamiliar Faces in a Priming Task across a Range of Viewpoints

Keyes, Helen and Zalicks, Catherine (2016) Socially Important Faces Are Processed Preferentially to Other Familiar and Unfamiliar Faces in a Priming Task across a Range of Viewpoints. PLOS ONE, 11 (5). ISSN 1932-6203

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Official URL: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.137...

Abstract

Using a priming paradigm, we investigate whether socially important faces are processed preferentially compared to other familiar and unfamiliar faces, and whether any such effects are affected by changes in viewpoint. Participants were primed with frontal images of personally familiar, famous or unfamiliar faces, and responded to target images of congruent or incongruent identity, presented in frontal, three quarter or profile views. We report that participants responded significantly faster to socially important faces (a friend’s face) compared to other highly familiar (famous) faces or unfamiliar faces. Crucially, responses to famous and unfamiliar faces did not differ. This suggests that, when presented in the context of a socially important stimulus, socially unimportant familiar faces (famous faces) are treated in a similar manner to unfamiliar faces. This effect was not tied to viewpoint, and priming did not affect socially important face processing differently to other faces.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Face perception, Familiarity
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology
Depositing User: Unnamed user with email helen.keyes@anglia.ac.uk
Date Deposited: 20 Jun 2016 11:10
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2016 11:10
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/700065

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