Vulnerabilities to agricultural production shocks: An extreme, plausible scenario for assessment of risk for the insurance sector

Lunt, Tobias and Jones, Aled W. and Mulhern, William S. and Lezaks, David P.M. and Jahn, Molly M. (2016) Vulnerabilities to agricultural production shocks: An extreme, plausible scenario for assessment of risk for the insurance sector. Climate Risk Management. ISSN 22120963 (Accepted)

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Official URL: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.crm.2016.05.001

Abstract

Climate risks pose a threat to the function of the global food system and therefore also a hazard to the global financial sector, the stability of governments, and the food security and health of the world’s population. This paper presents a method to assess plausible impacts of an agricultural production shock and potential materiality for global insurers. A hypothetical, near-term, plausible, extreme scenario was developed based upon modules of historical agricultural production shocks, linked under a warm phase El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) meteorological framework. The scenario included teleconnected floods and droughts in disparate agricultural production regions around the world, as well as plausible, extreme biotic shocks. In this scenario, global crop yield declines of 10% for maize, 11% for soy, 7% for wheat and 7% for rice result in quadrupled commodity prices and commodity stock fluctuations, civil unrest, significant negative humanitarian consequences and major financial losses worldwide. This work illustrates a need for the scientific community to partner across sectors and industries towards better-integrated global data, modeling and analytical capacities, to better respond to and prepare for concurrent agricultural failure. Governments, humanitarian organizations and the private sector collectively may recognize significant benefits from more systematic assessment of exposure to agricultural climate risk.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Breadbasket failure, Climate extremes
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology
Depositing User: Prof Aled Jones
Date Deposited: 10 Jun 2016 11:29
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2017 14:50
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/700036

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