Self-efficacy and relevance of bioscience for nursing, midwifery and healthcare students

Andrew, Sharon and McVicar, Andrew and Zanganeh, Mandana and Henderson, Nigel (2015) Self-efficacy and relevance of bioscience for nursing, midwifery and healthcare students. Journal of Clinical Nursing. ISSN 09621067

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Abstract

Abstract- Aims and objectives- To examine nursing, midwifery and allied healthcare students' self-efficacy for science, perceived relevance of bioscience to their studies and expectations for academic success and the changes that occur after completing first-year introductory bioscience subjects. Background- Bioscience is a foundation subject that underpins nursing, midwifery and other allied health courses. Bioscience subjects continue to be source of anxiety for students in those courses. Raising students' self-efficacy and perceptions of the importance and utility of bioscience to practice may be a way of ameliorating students' expectations and confidence in this subject area. Design- A prospective correlational survey design. Methods- Students were surveyed in the first semester of first year and the commencement of the second year. Students were drawn from nursing, midwifery, public health and allied health courses. The surveys contained scales for self-efficacy for science, perceived relevance of bioscience to their course and personal expectations for success in their bioscience subject. Results- Ninety-seven and 82 students completed survey 1 and 2 respectively. Twenty-six surveys could be matched. Self-efficacy increased from survey 1 to survey 2, but expectations for academic success and task value, a measure for relevance, were lower. This was statistically significant for the matched pair sample. Using a mean split, students with high self-efficacy valued science more and had higher expectations for success in their bioscience courses than those with low self-efficacy. Conclusion- Academic success in bioscience, confidence undertaking science tasks and perceiving bioscience as relevant to their course are interwoven concepts that are important for nursing, midwifery and applied healthcare students and ultimately for their professional practice. Relevance to clinical practice- Literature indicates practitioners may not feel confident in their bioscience knowledge. Assisting undergraduate students to develop confidence in and perceive the relevance of bioscience to their discipline may ultimately impact on clinical practice.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Citation: Andrew, S., McVicar, A., Zanganeh, M., & Henderson, N., 2015. Self‐efficacy and relevance of bioscience for nursing, midwifery and healthcare students. Journal of clinical nursing, 24(19-20), pp.2965-2972..
Faculty: Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education (for research post September 2011)
Depositing User: Mr I Walker
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2016 14:35
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2016 09:03
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/593041

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