Removing the own-race bias in face recognition by attentional shift using fixation crosses to diagnostic features: An eye-tracking study.

Hills, Peter J. and Cooper, Rachel E. and Pake, J. Michael (2013) Removing the own-race bias in face recognition by attentional shift using fixation crosses to diagnostic features: An eye-tracking study. Visual Cognition. ISSN 1464-0716

[img]
Preview
Text
Available under the following license: Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (283kB) | Preview

Abstract

Hills and Lewis (2011) have demonstrated that the own-race bias in face recognition can be reduced or even removed by guiding participants' attention and potentially eye movements to the most diagnostic visual features. Using the same old/new recognition paradigm as Hills and Lewis, we recorded Black and White participants' eye movements whilst viewing Black and White faces following fixation crosses that preceded the bridge of the nose (between the eyes) or the tip of the nose. White faces were more accurately recognized when following high fixation crosses (that preceded the bridge of the nose) than when following low fixation crosses. The converse was true for Black faces. These effects were independent of participant race. The fixation crosses attracted the first fixation but had less effect on other eye-tracking measures. Furthermore, the location of the first fixation was predictive of recognition accuracy. These results are consistent with an attentional allocation model of the own-race bias in face recognition and highlight the importance of the first fixation for face perception (cf. Hsiao & Cottrell, 2008).

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Citation: Hills, P.J., Cooper,R.E. and Pake,J.M. 2013. Removing the own-race bias in face recognition by attentional shift using fixation crosses to diagnostic features: An eye-tracking study. Visual Cognition 21(7), pp876-898..
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology
Depositing User: Mr I Walker
Date Deposited: 14 Oct 2014 14:50
Last Modified: 07 Jul 2016 12:52
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/332733

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item