Does facial expressivity count? How typically developing children respond initially to children with autism

Stagg, Steven D. and Slavny, Rachel and Hand, Charlotte and Cardoso, Alice and Smith, Pamela (2013) Does facial expressivity count? How typically developing children respond initially to children with autism. Autism. ISSN 1362-3613

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Abstract

Research investigating expressivity in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has reported flat affect or bizarre facial expressivity within this population. The impact expressivity may have on first impression formation has received little research input. We examined how videos of children with ASD were rated for expressivity by adults blind to the condition. We further investigated the friendship ratings given by 44 typically developing (TD) children to the same videos. These ratings were compared to friendship ratings given to video clips of typically developing children. Results demonstrated that adult raters, blind to the diagnosis of the children in the videos, rated ASD children as being less facially expressive than TD children. These ASD children in the videos were also rated lower on all aspects of our friendship measures when compared with the TD children. Results suggest that impression formation is less positive towards children with autism spectrum disorder than to typically developing children.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Citation: Stagg, S.D., Slavny, R., Hand, C., Cardoso, A. & Smith, P. 2013. Does facial expressivity count? How typically developing children respond initially to children with autism. Autism (online first) doi:10.1177/1362361313492392..
Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology
Depositing User: Mr I Walker
Date Deposited: 30 Apr 2014 15:43
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2017 08:52
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/316296

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