High performance working and wellbeing: sustainability of human resources

Keeble-Ramsay, Diane and Armitage, Andrew M.D. (2009) High performance working and wellbeing: sustainability of human resources. International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability. ISSN 1832-2077

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Abstract

The sustainability of human resourcing is dependent upon the wellbeing of the workforce. Human Capital models have largely resulted in short-term capitalistic restructuring and low cost savings within organisations, which are not sustainable within the long term. To achieve competitive advantage, it is accepted that organisations should aspire in the long term to high performance working. High performance working has been defined in terms ‘of the collective use of certain work organisation and human resource practices. Globalisation models have relied upon the management of human resources by locating the lowest cost model for delivery of services. This paper contends from research with HR professionals and managers, however, that the translation of high performance working still relies upon the psychological contract with workers. This work presents that this represents the locating of the lowest cost delivery for services or products represents solely a short-term model, which is not culturally sustainable. The consideration for the wellbeing of the workforce is not only paramount but will facilitate greater innovation and sustainability of competitive advantage, which will outweigh any short-term cost advantages.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Citation: Keeble-Ramsay, D. and Armitage, A., 2009. High performance working and wellbeing: sustainability of human resources. International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 5(6), pp.149-160..
Faculty: Lord Ashcroft International Business School
Depositing User: Mr I Walker
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2011 11:39
Last Modified: 07 Jul 2016 12:49
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/142722

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