Irish women in the diaspora: exclusions and inclusions

Walter, Bronwen (2004) Irish women in the diaspora: exclusions and inclusions. Women's Studies International Forum. ISSN 0277-5395

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Abstract

Irish women have a long history of emigration which provides parallels with the experiences of women now moving to settle in Ireland. In both cases, women migrants have been needed to fill the massive deficit of paid domestic labor in rapidly industrialising economies. Over the last two centuries, these destinations for Irish women have included the USA, Britain and Australia, as well as Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and Argentina. Some of the complexities in the positioning of migrant Irish women within the “diaspora spaces” they occupy are explored in this article. I identify ongoing disadvantage for certain groups of Irish-born women, drawing on evidence primarily from Britain, which has the largest contemporary diasporic Irish population. Comparisons are made with Irish women's experiences in the USA and Australia, using Census and survey data generated by and for the 2002 Task Force on Policy regarding Emigrants. The concept of diaspora explicitly includes those identifying themselves as Irish over several generations. I use qualitative findings from the Irish 2 Project, a recent study of the large second-generation Irish population in Britain, to examine narratives of women living in Manchester who grew up in “Irish” households and are subsequently negotiating hybrid identities in adulthood. These offer insights into longitudinal dimensions of migrant experience and the continuing significance of ethnic difference.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Citation: Walter, B., 2004. Irish women in the diaspora: exclusions and inclusions. Women's Studies International Forum, 27(4), pp.369-384..
Faculty: Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences
Depositing User: Mr I Walker
Date Deposited: 04 Nov 2010 12:23
Last Modified: 07 Jul 2016 12:48
URI: http://arro.anglia.ac.uk/id/eprint/114726

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